That one’s easy, just be Tony

Radio.jpg

Looking back (and listening back) to 60+ shows for Chicago Public Radio, it’s amazing how strong characters can really stick out from the crowd — and how thinly defined characters or “voices” can disappear into the ether. Playing for the radio ain’t no joke, at best you can maybe make the folks in the engineering studio 20 feet and two panes of glass away from you giggle a bit — and that’s usually only on some outtake that you push into the fold to get some sort-of reaction. It’s an understatement to say that it’s a technical medium, and amazing to learn how to translate stage personas into radio personas. That’s why recording shows like Phudie Mart or Ed Bus were such a treat. With storylines developed over years through numerous mediums using primarily the same actors, it was fun to get the scenes down as written — and then do alternate takes of the real scenes . . . as if this is what Ed Bus would really say. Also very interesting that you begin to appreciate pauses and silences — and that it’s possible to get laughs on the radio with (again, no duh right?) total silence. Using the stage to create the characters, using the radio to hone the storylines and plots . . . all led to strong material and confidence for the screenplays.

Radio.jpg

Looking back (and listening back) to 60+ shows for Chicago Public Radio, it’s amazing how strong characters can really stick out from the crowd — and how thinly defined characters or “voices” can disappear into the ether. Playing for the radio ain’t no joke, at best you can maybe make the folks in the engineering studio 20 feet and two panes of glass away from you giggle a bit — and that’s usually only on some outtake that you push into the fold to get some sort-of reaction. It’s an understatement to say that it’s a technical medium, and amazing to learn how to translate stage personas into radio personas. That’s why recording shows like Phudie Mart or Ed Bus were such a treat. With storylines developed over years through numerous mediums using primarily the same actors, it was fun to get the scenes down as written — and then do alternate takes of the real scenes . . . as if this is what Ed Bus would really say. Also very interesting that you begin to appreciate pauses and silences — and that it’s possible to get laughs on the radio with (again, no duh right?) total silence. Using the stage to create the characters, using the radio to hone the storylines and plots . . . all led to strong material and confidence for the screenplays.

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